FIVE Social Media Trends Marketers Won’t Be Able to Ignore [2016]

Marketers Must Adapt or Die As Social Media Continues to Evolve

With the year coming to an end, headlines like “The War on Advertising” and “The Perfect Storm” are becoming more common as marketers are getting the year-end jitters, asking “WHAT’S NEXT?” and “Where is there space for my brand in 2016?” While the speed of social has always been dizzying — new platforms, behaviors, memes and audiences are born and die every minute – the year ahead promises to be especially frenetic.

When it comes to social and digital marketing, 2016 is going to be an adapt-or-die year, one in which marketers will need to evolve as tectonic shifts in the way people use social networks and consume media on them will force massive change.

The rise of ad blocking is forcing us to focus our efforts on social, but most major social platforms are blocking off their exits. The growing dominance of one-to-one messaging platforms has us scrambling to find a meaningful way to exist inside them, but there has been little progress. Meanwhile, as every major social platform becomes more pay-to-play, marketers are frantically leveling up their advocate strategy and influencer game, and trying to maintain relevance organically. And to top it off, optimizing content for each platform has become exponentially more complex. In other words, 2016 looks to be the year that social hits the fan.

7-side-effects-of-social-media

Here are the five social trends marketers will not be able to ignore next year:

1. Messaging platforms will trump broadcast social networks. The explosive growth of messaging platforms continues on its trajectory toward domination, expected to expand from 2.5 billion to 3.6 billion global users by 2018 — already a full 25% larger than the audience for social media. While one-to-one messaging soars, Facebook has noted that its users are posting less and less — in fact, only 20% of millennials use broadcast social networks to post photos and videos at all.

Marketers face a critical challenge, trying to find authentic ways to fit their brands into one-to-one messaging platforms without annoying their audiences. Social platforms in China and Korea have taken stabs at it — brands have all sorts of ways to add value to their audience on platforms like WeChat and KakaoTalk. But will western audiences be open to these tactics, or do we have to find another way? Branded emoji keyboards are a strong first step into this space, but we’ll need more innovation, considering that the two biggest players in the game — WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger — currently offer no such options for brands.

2. Marketers will realize that Snapchat isn’t social — it’s TV. Continuing diminishing returns will teach marketers that using Snapchat as an organic social channel isn’t cost-effective, and that Snapchat isn’t the next Facebook or Instagram, but the new TV. Think appointment-watching, awareness and buying eyeballs — not growing communities, editorial calendars and real-time marketing. The language that the “new TV” uses is different, but it’s still a newfangled TV spot, not a series of regularly scheduled organic snaps to grow your audience.

3. Ad blocking turns all eyes to social. Now that Apple’s joined the war on interruptive ads, and the use of ad-blocking software has risen 48% within a year, brands will be forced to shift even more of their resources to social media, native advertising and influencer campaigns. 2016 might be the year of the nail in the coffin for digital display ads, meaning brands will need to rethink the role of digital and its place in the purchase funnel. Digital could become a pull-marketing only space, and even more synonymous with social.

4. The Hotel California effect will change the game. Increasingly, social networks are becoming Hotel Californias — closed systems where you can check out, but you can never leave. Snapchat doesn’t lead outside the network, Instagram barely does and Facebook is making every effort to keep users from heading outside of its walled garden. More alarmingly, Twitter users are increasingly hesitant to click on links — the behavior is mirroring the platform shifts. The implications for marketers are enormous: Brands will need to optimize for on-platform success and conversation, and minimize CTAs and clickthroughs.

5. Social video will get more crowded and complicated. Gone are the days of posting your brand’s video to YouTube and syndicating it across other social networks. Now a video needs to be optimized for every platform it’s posted on in order to bolster its chances of success. It starts with YouTube, but then needs to be reshaped as a Facebook video, a Twitter video, an Instagram video and potentially a Vine or Tumblr video, for starters. A single video needs to be tailored for each platform, optimized for the audience and cultural norms of each. And deciding on a bespoke paid and influencer strategy for each platform also ratchets up the complexity. With VR looming in 2016, and live-streaming gaining even more momentum, pushing out that branded content continues to get exponentially more difficult.

source: AdAge

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The Power of Restraint: Always Leave Them Wanting More | Eminem – rap god + search results god

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The Power of Restraint: Always Leave Them Wanting More

by Anthony K. Tjan  |   9:00 AM October 15, 2013

The setting: the spectacular office of one of the most respected names in entertainment, a senior executive in the motion picture industry. The players: the executive, accompanied by his bevy of direct reports and support staff, plus a CEO friend of mine and his chairman (we’ll call him Mr. Chairman).

The meeting was unusual in its purpose. Mr. Chairman, who does not come from the entertainment industry, wanted to share his epiphany on how movie-makers should rethink the categorization of movie genres.  His hypothesis was that movies should not be called romantic, horror, thriller, etc., but instead use a schema inspired by psychologist Abraham Maslow’s famous “hierarchy of needs” that might better explain and predict which movies are likely to succeed.

After the regular pleasantries, Mr. Chairman, a soft-spoken and even-keeled individual, began sharing his new taxonomy for the movie industry, scrawling some sketches along the way.  The meeting moved along quickly and positively. Within minutes, curiosity was piqued, and by the 10-minute mark the entertainment mogul and his entourage were engrossed.  After about 20 minutes, they seemed enthralled, having embraced several of “wow moments” described by Mr. Chairman.

Precisely at this high point of excitement, around the 25-minute mark of the meeting, Mr. Chairman glanced at his watch and announced that he had already taken a meaningful amount of their time and should leave now. He asked them to follow up if any of his thoughts stuck.  With some bewilderment goodbyes were said, and that was it — meeting done and wrapped up in just under 30 minutes.

But, of course, a long-term relationship ensued.

For my CEO friend it was a career life lesson: “Leave them wanting more.” But this was not a Machiavellian strategy born out of a premeditated plan. It was the natural product of Mr. Chairman’s innate leadership, humility, patience, emotional intelligence, and introverted disposition.  With those qualities come self control, and an instinct for when to apply restraint.

There’s a common misperception that extroverts are the best leaders and sales people.   Adam Grant at the Wharton School has conducted studies showing that “ambiverts” (people who are a mixture of extrovert and introvert) are actually the most effective in sales, followed by introverts and then extroverts.  In a three-month study of 300 sales people, ambiverts generated 32% more revenue than extroverts, and 24% more than introverts.

It is not that extroverted behavior is bad, but rather that when it’s not leavened with restraint and listening, it can be limiting.  Most extroverts would have loved exciting an audience as Mr. Chairman did — and likely would have had trouble ending the meeting as he did, instead over-selling to the point of diminishing returns.

The power of restraint is a lesson that cuts across all aspects of our lives.  It is a lesson that I have tried to internalize after writing a book and now numerous blog posts with editors exceptional at, yes, editing. It is not just about grammatical correctness or even structure, but a centrifugal type of editing that teaches the discipline of choice, and restrains one from making the mistake of over-telling, over-selling.

In business, we don’t edit enough. Any list of three top priorities invariably includes an “a,b, and c” below each one — which really means a list of nine. It is always a challenge to maintain focus on what truly matters — “the big rocks in the jar” as Stephen Covey would often say. Covey talked of filling a jar that represents life. You need to start with bigger rocks (the largest priorities, such as family and health) before you put in the medium size rocks, smaller pebbles, sand, and water.  If you go in that order, everything fits in the jar.  Going the other way does not work (just try it), and crowds out the things that really matter.

To practice more restraint, to stay focused on the things that really matter, consider the following:

  1. Start with self-awareness. Susan Cain, author of the book Quiet, has a simple online “quiet quiz” to let you know if you lean toward introversion or extroversion.
  2. Delegate, don’t command and control. Effective managers and leaders understand how to motivate with just enough direction to get multiplier-force leverage, because people feel a true sense of ownership. Micromanagement is a symptom of an inability to delegate and of letting your desire to do overwhelm your need to lead.
  3. Sell with more judo and less karate. This is an analogy I use often to stress, similar to the delegation point above, the important of allowing people to come to their own conclusions and using that to create intrinsic motivation to get the task done.
  4. Quality over quantity of voice. We all know the rare type of individual who does not talk often, but when she does, everyone listens.  There is tremendous power in increasing one’s listen-to-talk ratio and then choosing the right moments for expression.  Quality of comment usually matters more than the quantity of comments.
  5. Leave them wanting more.  This was the key lesson from Mr. Chairman.  When you lead a meeting, ask yourself each time it ends if you left people wanting more.  Consider cutting — at least mentally — your meeting time by at 20-30% to make sure you focus on the right things first, and to understand that your goal may be to have them wish for more time, or even another meeting.

Ultimately Mies van der Rohe’s got it right. His “less is more” maxim extends beyond architecture to a principle we should use much more in business practice.

More blog posts by

Anthony Tjan is CEO, Managing Partner and Founder of the venture capital firm Cue Ball, vice chairman of the advisory firm Parthenon, and co-author of the New York Times bestseller Heart, Smarts, Guts, and Luck (HBR Press, 2012).

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10 Paradoxical Traits Of Creative People + SMM At Its Best!

Creative people are humble and proud. Creative people tend to be both extroverted and introverted. Creative people are rebellious and conservative. How creative are you?

 

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I frequently find myself thinking about whether I am an artist or an entrepreneur.

I am simply trying my best to create my own unique path.

It is safe to say that more and more entrepreneurs are artists, and artists of all kinds are entrepreneurs. And the trend is only on the rise as all things (art, science, technology, business, culture, spirituality) are increasingly converging.

Creativity is the common theme that drives both entrepreneurs and artists alike. But creative people are often also paradoxical.

Over this past Labor Day weekend, I found myself reading excerpts from distinguished professor of psychology and management Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s (pronounced me-HIGH chick-sent-me-HIGH-ee) seminal book Creativity: The Work and Lives of 91 Eminent People (HarperCollins, 1996).

He writes:

“I have devoted 30 years of research to how creative people live and work, to make more understandable the mysterious process by which they come up with new ideas and new things. If I had to express in one word what makes their personalities different from others, it’s complexity. They show tendencies of thought and action that in most people are segregated. They contain contradictory extremes; instead of being an individual, each of them is a multitude.”

Mihaly describes ten traits often contradictory in nature, that are frequently present in creative people. In Creativity, Mihaly outlines these:

1. Creative people have a great deal of physical energy, but they’re also often quiet and at rest.

They work long hours, with great concentration, while projecting an aura of freshness and enthusiasm.

2. Creative people tend to be smart yet naive at the same time.

“It involves fluency, or the ability to generate a great quantity of ideas; flexibility, or the ability to switch from one perspective to another; and originality in picking unusual associations of ideas. These are the dimensions of thinking that most creativity tests measure and that most workshops try to enhance.”

3. Creative people combine playfulness and discipline, or responsibility and irresponsibility. But this playfulness doesn’t go very far without its antithesis, a quality of doggedness, endurance, and perseverance.

“Despite the carefree air that many creative people affect, most of them work late into the night and persist when less driven individuals would not. Vasari wrote in 1550 that when Renaissance painter Paolo Uccello was working out the laws of visual perspective, he would walk back and forth all night, muttering to himself: “What a beautiful thing is this perspective!” while his wife called him back to bed with no success.”

4. Creative people alternate between imagination and fantasy, and a rooted sense of reality.

Great art and great science involve a leap of imagination into a world that is different from the present.

5. Creative people tend to be both extroverted and introverted.

We’re usually one or the other, either preferring to be in the thick of crowds or sitting on the sidelines and observing the passing show. Creative individuals, on the other hand, seem to exhibit both traits simultaneously.

6. Creative people are humble and proud at the same time.

It is remarkable to meet a famous person who you expect to be arrogant or supercilious, only to encounter self-deprecation and shyness instead.

7. Creative people, to an extent, escape rigid gender role stereotyping.

When tests of masculinity and femininity are given to young people, over and over one finds that creative and talented girls are more dominant and tough than other girls, and creative boys are more sensitive and less aggressive than their male peers.

8. Creative people are both rebellious and conservative.

It is impossible to be creative without having first internalized an area of culture. So it’s difficult to see how a person can be creative without being both traditional and conservative and at the same time rebellious and iconoclastic.

9. Most creative people are very passionate about their work, yet they can be extremely objective about it as well.

Without the passion, we soon lose interest in a difficult task. Yet without being objective about it, our work is not very good and lacks credibility. Here is how the historian Natalie Davis puts it:

“I think it is very important to find a way to be detached from what you write, so that you can’t be so identified with your work that you can’t accept criticism and response, and that is the danger of having as much affect as I do. But I am aware of that and of when I think it is particularly important to detach oneself from the work, and that is something where age really does help.”

10. Creative people’s openness and sensitivity often exposes them to suffering and pain, yet also to a great deal of enjoyment.

“Perhaps the most important quality, the one that is most consistently present in all creative individuals, is the ability to enjoy the process of creation for its own sake. Without this trait, poets would give up striving for perfection and would write commercial jingles, economists would work for banks where they would earn at least twice as much as they do at universities, and physicists would stop doing basic research and join industrial laboratories where the conditions are better and the expectations more predictable.”

Paradoxical or not, what I have learned most is that there is no formula for individual creation. As Mihay says, “creative individuals are remarkable for their ability to adapt to almost any situation and to make do with whatever is at hand to reach their goals.” So, more than anything else, what it takes to be creative is resourcefulness and the courage not to give up.

 

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Bullish On Digital: McKinsey Global Survey Results | + Search Results Defined

CEOs and other senior executives are increasingly engaged as their companies step up efforts to build digital enterprises.

August 2013 | by Brad Brown, Johnson Sikes, and Paul Willmott

 

As businesses continue to embrace digital tools and technologies—especially when engaging with customers—C-level executives in a recent McKinsey survey1 say they are stepping up their own involvement in shaping and driving digital strategies. This is vital to the success of digital programs, as survey respondents most often cite a lack of senior-management interest as the reason for an initiative’s failure. Respondents also suggest that organizational alignment is critical to seeing real business impact from digital.

In the survey, we asked respondents about five digital-enterprise trends: big data and advanced analytics, digital engagement of customers, digital engagement of employees and external partners, automation, and digital innovation.2 Specifically, we inquired about their companies’ adoption of and focus on each trend, what impact digital technologies can (and do) have on their businesses, and what obstacles companies face in meeting their digital goals. We found that despite the organizational and talent challenges, executives remain optimistic about digital business.

They report, for example, that their companies are using digital technology more and more to engage with customers and reach them through new channels. What’s more, growing shares report that their companies are making digital marketing and customer engagement a high strategic priority. Nevertheless, there is more work to do: most executives estimate that at best, their companies are one-quarter of the way toward realizing the end-state vision for their digital programs.

Focusing on customers and the top line

Executives say each of the five digital trends we asked about is a strategic priority for their companies.3 Of these, the trend that ranks highest is customer engagement: 56 percent say digital engagement of customers is at least a top-ten company priority, and on the whole respondents report notable progress since 2012 in deploying practices related to this trend (Exhibit 1). Companies have made particularly big gains in their use of digital to position material consistently across channels and to make personalized or targeted offers available online.

Exhibit 1

The digital engagement of customers accelerates.

 

By comparison, companies have been slower to adopt digital approaches to engaging their own employees, suppliers, and external partners. Here, executives say their companies most often use online tools for employee evaluations and feedback or knowledge management; smaller shares report more advanced uses, such as collaborative product design or knowledge sharing across the supply chain.

Responses also indicate growth in the company-wide use of big data and advanced analytics, matching our experience with companies of all stripes, where we are seeing executives consider analytics a critical priority and dedicate increasing attention to the deployment of new analytic tools. Notably, respondents report increased use of data to improve decision making, R&D processes, and budgeting and forecasting (Exhibit 2). What’s more, executives say their companies are using analytics to grow: the largest shares report focusing their analytics efforts on either increasing revenue or improving process quality; reducing costs tends to rank as a lower-level priority.

Exhibit 2

The use of big-data applications has also grown.

Likewise, when asked about the next wave of business-process automation, respondents say their companies are automating a wide range of functions to improve the overall quality of processes (by removing breaks or errors, for example) or to build new digital capabilities (for example, remote monitoring) into the processes; few say their companies have automated processes primarily to replace labor. When asked about innovation practices, more than 40 percent of respondents say their companies are either incorporating digital technology into existing products or improving their technology operating models (for instance, using cloud computing). Just 23 percent say they are creating digital-only products.

More-involved CEOs

Across most of the C-suite, larger shares of respondents report that their companies’ senior executives are now supporting and getting involved in digital initiatives (Exhibit 3). This year, 31 percent say their CEOs personally sponsor these initiatives, up from 23 percent who said so in 2012. This growth illustrates the importance of these new digital programs to corporate performance, as well as the conundrum that many organizations face: often, the CEO is the only executive who has the mandate and ability to drive such a cross-cutting program.

Exhibit 3

CEOs are now more likely to sponsor digital initiatives than they were in 2012.

Thirty percent of respondents also report a chief digital officer (CDO) on their companies’ executive teams, a sign of the widespread awareness that these initiatives are important. This result also squares with our experience that some organizations have created the CDO role as an executive-level position with cross-cutting responsibilities for all digital initiatives. In a sign that this new role is already creating value, respondents whose organizations have a CDO also indicate significantly more progress toward their digital vision than those without one.

Organizational challenges continue

Despite the host of technical challenges in implementing digital, respondents say the success (or failure) of these programs ultimately relies on organization and leadership, rather than technology considerations. We asked executives to think of past initiatives at their companies (one initiative that worked and one that didn’t) and then identify the most decisive factors behind each outcome. Executives most often attribute the success of digital programs to managerial factors—senior management’s interest and attention, internal leadership, good program management, and alignment between organizational structure and goals—and are less likely to cite any technical considerations (Exhibit 4). Interestingly, the absence of senior-management interest is the factor respondents most often identify as contributing to an initiative’s failure.

Exhibit 4

Digital outcomes rely on management and oversight.

Organizational issues can also hinder companies’ efforts to meet goals and see real impact from digital. As in 2012, executives most often say misaligned organizational structures are the biggest challenge their companies face in meeting digital goals. This is followed by insufficiently reworked business processes (to take advantage of the digital opportunities) and difficulty finding functional talent (such as data scientists or digital marketers). In contrast, a lack of infrastructure and absence of good data are less pressing than they were last year.

At companies where organizational structures do pose a challenge, fewer report a corporate-wide financial impact from digital business: 31 percent of these executives say their digital efforts have yielded a measurable impact on top- or bottom-line results, compared with 43 percent of executives who aren’t facing this issue. At the same time, many respondents are unsure of how best to measure their efforts: only 36 percent say their companies have a top-line metric for monitoring their digital programs’ overall progress.

High expectations and continued investment

Challenges aside, executives remain bullish on digital business: 65 percent say they expect these trends will increase their companies’ operating income over the next three years, similar to last year’s results.4 CEOs are more positive than executives in any other role, with more than one in five saying they expect income from digital to increase by more than 30 percent in three years’ time.

When asked about their expectations for digital’s top line, executives at business-to-business companies are actually more optimistic than their business-to-consumer peers, perhaps due to the increased consumer expectations, price transparency, and competitive pressures that business-to-consumer companies face. While respondents see value from all five trends, they are hoping for more value from customer engagement than other trends: executives who expect an income boost from digital business attribute the largest part of that increase to digital customer engagement (Exhibit 5). Among those expecting a negative impact on company income, the largest share of respondents say it’s due to their inability to adequately respond to changing customer behavior and expectations.

Exhibit 5

Of the ways that companies can use digital, customer engagement promises the most potential value.

Executives say their companies continue to invest heavily in their digital programs—and, on average, expect to spend more relative to last year’s results. There are some notable differences across regions: respondents in North America, for example, say their companies are investing at levels well ahead of those in other regions, including Europe, where companies traditionally keep pace with North America (Exhibit 6). But currently, only about one-third of executives say their companies are spending the right amount on digital, and many worry about underinvesting in these programs. Still, the responses indicate that companies have a long way to go in accomplishing their digital-business agendas. Fifty-seven percent say their companies are up to one-quarter of the way toward realizing their end-state visions for their digital programs, and just 40 percent say their organizations’ digital efforts have yielded a measurable business impact thus far. Executives who say their companies spend the right amount on digital are much likelier than average to report real business impact (60 percent), as are those who say their companies are at least halfway toward their end-state visions (56 percent), but overall, there is room for improvement.

Exhibit 6

Across regions, companies’ investments in digital business vary.

Looking ahead

  • Find the right digital leaders. Leadership is the most decisive factor for a digital program’s success or failure. Increasing C-level involvement is a positive sign, and the creation of a CDO role seems to be a leading indicator for increasing the speed of advancement. These developments must continue if companies are to meet their high aspirations for digital.
  • Manage expectations. Just as important as finding the right leader is setting the right agenda and maintaining an aspirational vision without straying into overexuberance for digital. Leaders will have to walk this line carefully, given executives’ reports of organizational, technical, and cultural challenges.
  • Prioritize talent. Not surprisingly, survey respondents indicate concerns about finding the talent their companies need to realize their digital goals. Technical, functional, and business skills are all critical for digital programs. We have seen some companies begin emulating the high-tech practice of “acqui-hiring” (that is, acquiring small companies largely for their employees rather than their products). But finding and hiring talent is only part of the solution; no matter where the talent comes from, development and retention are equally important in a sellers’ market.
About the authors

The contributors to the development and analysis of this survey include Brad Brown, a director in McKinsey’s New York office; Johnson Sikes, a consultant in the New York office; and Paul Willmott, a director in the London office.

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SEO Magic?… Not! It’s REAL, as in Real-Time Results, Defined. | SEO SME Proof of Process

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The Surprising Benefits of Working Backward + SEO Magic?… Not! It’s REAL!!

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Coming at problems from novel perspectives causes the brain to function differently, often yielding unexpected results.

For a number of weeks this past spring, every time my friend Jane and I would take our regular walk alongside a pond and creek, a bald eagle would swerve in our direction, almost as though to greet us.

Eagles are not new here in New York’s Hudson Valley region and their increasing presence speaks to a species restoration project that began 30 years ago. Yet even if it is not uncommon to see this sentinel bird, it is always a privilege to spot one.

What I noticed about this eagle, this spring, was that it almost always took the exact same flight path. This led me to believe it was nesting in a tall tree near the pond. Weeks of careful observation led nowhere. The nest was not in the towering oak, nor was it in a sycamore tree with a pronounced notch in its upper branches.

Finally one afternoon, in utter frustration, we walked the path backward, looking at the treetops over the pond from a reverse perspective. And there, at last, in the upper limbs of a white pine, we detected the huge, ramshackle bowl of twigs, sticks and branches.

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Crazy Wisdom

The exercise, and its reward, put me in mind of how coming at things backward, awkwardly and in uncertain steps can lead to unanticipated and astonishing breakthroughs. And how discoveries can be made at this intersection of the comedic and the sublime.

Folklore suggests that 100 steps backward are as good as 1,000 steps forward. The Lakota Indians honor the “crazy wisdom” of the contrarian Heyoka jokester/sage, who does things like speak in reverse sentences and ride his horse backward.

The value of this tactic isn’t just the stuff of folk wisdom and unexpected discoveries. Dutch neuroscientists were curious whether different mental processes are employed when we are walking toward something or away from it. Their study, published in Psychological Science in May 2009, found that subjects who walked even a few steps backward were far more focused and attentive than those who didn’t.

The trickster’s oppositional approach can work for me as a writer. From time to time when I get stuck on an article or essay, I’ll flip the order of the argument, beginning with the conclusion and ending with the introduction. While it’s not a structure I am likely to keep, it is an efficient way to reconsider what I’m trying to say.

If it’s a profile, bringing a quote from the subject’s later years up to the front of the piece may shake up the chronology of the story, but it gives context to what is to come. This isn’t exactly the same as walking backward, but it is another mode of stirring up the conventional order of things and finding a fresh, and perhaps stronger, perspective.

Getting Ahead by Moving Backward

Christine Weber, a clinical neuropsychologist in Seaford, N.Y., agrees that reversing the order of one’s approach has its benefits. “This forces the brain to think in a different way — it’s a rewiring and changes the focus,” she says. “The brain is almost always more active when it comes to novel stimuli and information. A new task makes a new connection in the brain because it has more to process.

“When you do something you are unaccustomed to, the signals are different,” Weber adds. “This speaks to a plasticity in the brain. And novel things require more cognitive energy; they are not ingrained. As in walking backward — you are not used to it. It requires extra effort.”

I suspect this reverse process is not just an exercise of the mind but one of the spirit as well. Paulus Berensohn is an acclaimed ceramist, teacher and writer whose pots and words alike are vessels for reflection. When he was invited to be an artist-in-residence at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, in 1987, he declined the offer, but asked if he could come help prepare food.

In his evocative meditation “Whatever We Touch Is Touching Us,” he writes, “I thought I would be more comfortable, perhaps make a more easeful relationship with the students, faculty and staff if I came in through the back door, so to speak. … So I worked in the kitchen.”

Berensohn reflected on how preparing meals, sometimes in silence, was a novel way to enter the community. “It was a new experience for me, this serving of the soup,” he said. “At first I was just … standing there ladling, offering, making contact. Simply serving soup, a little dance, a little communion. This bowl is for you, and this one? It’s for you!” A strong, continuing presence at Haystack for decades to come, Berensohn and his kitchen labors revealed to the entire group how the authority of a teacher from time to time depends on a willing and gracious subservience, whether as servant or student.

Surely this is the paradox. The older we get, the more likely we are to understand the intelligent, appropriate, linear progression to attain the things we want and need. Life’s experience has taught us to appreciate rationality, consistency, the common-sense, one-step-forward-at-a-time approach to achieving goals, whether they have to do with professional goals, retirement accounts or something else entirely.

Yet at the same time, it also becomes easier to understand that inverting the process has its value too. Incongruity, surprise and the utterly unexpected angle offer their own lessons. Discovering the eagle’s nest, whether it is literal or figurative, can be the result of reversal as much as one of advance.

Source: nextavenue | Akiko Busch | June 28, 2013

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SEO Magic?… Not! It’s REAL, as in Real-Time Results. | SEO SME Proof of Process

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The Real-Time Results, Social Media Revolution
as Harnessed & Produced by Vincent Medina | ArtfulMind.Biz

The Social Media Revolution is carving out unparallelled opportunities in online marketing. The time has come for businesses to build powerful presence and visibility through Social Media Online Marketing initiatives. I provide REAL-TIME RESULTS as proof of process. In fact, I am including PROOF OF WORK via organic LINKS showing real-time search domination results.

You’ll see a focus that is on relevant, current media that’s targeted toward delivering solution, insight, up-to-the-moment, useful information wrapped in a aesthetically pleasing graphic package. My accurate process delivers an added bonus of exponential click-thru ops + unmatched visibility increase
over a measurable, yet relatively short period.


Expert: Advertising + Process Improvement + Interactive Design + Marketing + Printing + Google Search Domination + SEO + Social Media

V I N C E N T   M E D I N A   |   310 251 9728    |   Vincent@ArtfulMind.BIZ

Four Principles for Better Government + SEO SME Proof of Process

 

Four Principles for Better Government

June 13, 2013 | Diana Farell | Global Leader + Co-founder – The McKinsey Center for Government at McKinsey & Company

 

 

 

I’ve spent much of my life thinking about how government works. In my time at McKinsey and at the White House National Economic Council, I’ve become increasingly convinced that government can do a better job for its constituents without getting into partisan debates and politicized headlines. My LinkedIn posts will be mostly about what I see as one of the biggest societal questions: how to create an effective government that we can afford.

The good news is that some governments have hit upon parts of the answer. At the McKinsey Center for Government, we’ve studied hundreds of public-sector initiatives worldwide to find those that made the most impact without breaking the bank. Four themes stood out in our research; these four themes constitute an agenda for more effective yet affordable government.

 

1. Make policy based on evidence, not politics.

Cynics might say that politicians typically engage in “politics-based evidence making”— they select only the data that fits their ideologies. But certain governments are making a strong push toward the opposite: evidence-based policy making. They’re using hard data and statistical analysis to inform decisions.

One example is the UK government’s Behavioral Insights Team, which uses data from randomized control trials to design and refine interventions. By testing small changes—like tweaking the language and tone of the letter that the tax department sends to delinquent taxpayers—the team identified interventions expected to generate significant savings for the UK government. It’s now advising other governments on how to do what it does.

 

2. Get citizens involved.

Innovative governments are actively soliciting input and ideas from citizens. This isn’t just about giving citizens a voice—it’s also good for productivity, especially when combined with innovations such as open data or “lean” service delivery.

The city of Cologne, Germany, recently invited residents to help decide how to allocate 10 percent of the municipal budget. The mayors of Boston and Philadelphia have each created an Office of New Urban Mechanics, which works with residents to fund and launch promising ideas about how to improve civic services. New York City’s 311 system allows New Yorkers to report and track non-emergency complaints via a website, a mobile app, text messaging, Skype, or a phone call. The system now processes 60 percent of service requests online, lowering transaction and issue-resolution costs.

 

3. Build expertise where it matters.

Recognizing that mission-driven employees are among their greatest assets, a number of governments are making big investments in capability building—they’re helping employees develop skills that truly make a difference. Project management is one such skill. Think about this: a study by McKinsey and Oxford University revealed that budget overruns in about 80 percent of government IT projects are due to managerial—not technical—shortcomings.

The US Office of Multifamily Housing Programs, a HUD agency, recently undertook a “lean management” program that included a series of process improvements and lots of coaching on project management and problem solving. The program yielded a more than 70 percent reduction in the agency’s backlog of housing applications and a 35 percent productivity improvement.

 

4. Harness the best of the private and social sectors.

Innovative governments are embracing closer collaboration with companies and nongovernment entities. The US government’s Challenge.gov platform, for example, invites organizations and individuals to solve “challenges”—in effect, to submit RFPs—in exchange for prize money. Since its launch, 45 federal agencies have awarded more than $13.9 million in prize money through 205 challenges. With Challenge.gov, the government gets more people thinking about how to solve tough problems, and it pays only for solutions that work. The same principle is what led Todd Park, the US chief technology officer, to start “Datapaloozas”—events at which innovators and entrepreneurs build cost-saving apps using government datasets.

These four themes are central to what I call “government by design,” a more systematic approach to government for these challenging times. What are some things your government—whether at the national, regional, or local level—is doing right? Or what are some things you’ve seen other governments do that you wish your government would adopt?

 

Join the global conversation about how together we can create more effective government.

Visit the MCG website and follow @Farrell_Diana on Twitter.

Photo: Jamie Squire/Getty Images

 

SEO SME Proof of Process

What are the Trends?

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The Real-Time Results, Social Media Revolution
as Harnessed & Produced by Vincent Medina | ArtfulMind.Biz

The Social Media Revolution is carving out unparallelled opportunities in online marketing. The time has come for businesses to build powerful presence and visibility through Social Media Online Marketing initiatives. I provide REAL-TIME RESULTS as proof of process. In fact, I am including PROOF OF WORK via organic LINKS showing real-time search domination results.

You’ll see a focus that is on relevant, current media that’s targeted toward delivering solution, insight, up-to-the-moment, useful information wrapped in a aesthetically pleasing graphic package. My accurate process delivers an added bonus of exponential click-thru ops + unmatched visibility increase
over a measurable, yet relatively short period.


Expert: Advertising + Process Improvement + Interactive Design + Marketing + Printing + Google Search Domination + SEO + Social Media

V I N C E N T   M E D I N A   |   310 251 9728      Vincent@ArtfulMind.BIZ

Tours of Duty: The New Employer-Employee Compact | HBR, June 2013

“adaptability and risk taking are acknowledged as crucial to success…”

https://i1.wp.com/www.growthbusiness.co.uk/article_images/articledir_4209/2104778/8_fullsize.jpg

by Reid Hoffman, Ben Casnocha, and Chris Yeh (HBR.org)

[ Tiny start-ups out-execute corporate giants all the time, despite seemingly huge disadvantages in resources and competitive position. Start-ups succeed in large part because their founders, executives, and early employees are highly adaptable, entrepreneurial types who are motivated to out-hustle, out-network, and out-risk their competitors—and who thus generate outsize rewards. ]

For most of the 20th century, the relationship between employers and employees in the developed world was all about stability and lifetime loyalty. That has recently changed, giving way to a transactional, laissez-faire approach that serves neither party well.

A new arrangement is needed, the authors argue—one built on alliance (usually temporary) and reciprocity. The high-tech start-up community of Silicon Valley is pointing the way—and companies that wish to be similarly agile and entrepreneurial can learn valuable lessons from its example.

Under the new compact, both employer and employee seek to add value to each other. Employees invest in the company’s adaptability; the company invests in employees’ employability. Hoffman (a cofounder of LinkedIn), Casnocha (a technology entrepreneur), and Yeh (an entrepreneur and angel investor) outline three simple, straightforward ways in which companies can make the new compact tangible and workable. These are (1) hiring employees for explicit “tours of duty,” (2) encouraging, even subsidizing, employees’ efforts to build networks outside the organization, and (3) establishing active alumni networks that will enable career-long relationships with employees after they’ve moved on.

In the war for talent, such a compact can be a secret weapon that helps you fill your ranks with the creative, adaptive superstars who fuel entrepreneurial success.

source: hbr.org/2013/06/tours-of-duty-the-new-employer-employee-compact

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